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DECLUTTERING EVERY PART OF YOUR LIFE

Updated: Nov 2, 2023



We think of clutter as ‘stuff’ that begins to build up like magazines we put in a pile because we’re going to read them ‘someday,’ or those gadgets or other things we take to the garage that ‘we just know we may need some day.’ We think of clutter in terms of physical space; however, clutter is much more than that. In fact, the most insidious elements of clutter may not be physical at all.


In this excellent discussion on clutter and its visual, mental and emotional effects Anna Runkle challenges us to think of clutter not as things getting in our way but as a symptom of an area or areas in our lives that are trauma-driven and we need to address. In her YouTube video (see below) titled “Heal Chaos and Overwhelm: DECLUTTER Every Part of Your Life” she reviews clutter in our lives in the following areas.

1. Physical clutter – our messy garage or closets filled with ‘stuff’ that we don’t and probably won’t use soon but take up space that could be put to much better use. More importantly she explains how this ‘stuff’ taxes our thoughts, moods, mind, will and emotions.


2. Mental clutter – like a ‘bag of cats’ are thoughts constantly swirling through our minds, interrupting our focus and pushing out the things that we should be thinking about. A classic issue for over-thinkers, worriers, and those with nostalgia.


3. Emotional clutter – a combination of old beliefs, holding onto the ‘woulda, coulda, shoulda’, or resentment. As she stated, “outrage and anger are emotional clutter that we must put aside.”


4. Relationship clutter – family, friends, co-workers and romantic partners can all contribute to relationship clutter. We need to declutter our relationships by recognizing people who no longer belong in our life and make room for people with whom we have an affinity.


5. Time clutter – allowing ourselves to take on more than we can handle – ‘biting off more than we can chew’ as we’ve heard so many times; becoming overbooked often to please people but at great expense to ourselves.

According to author Anna Runkle, clutter is much different from hoarding, but clutter is spawned from a condition known as Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or c-PTSD that is often the result of childhood trauma that becomes the sort of ‘baggage’ we drag with us through life.

BENEFITS OF DECLUTTERING

She goes on to say that decluttering is a powerful “re-regulation” exercise with many good benefits, not the least of which is giving the person a sense of being back in control! She lists several other benefits to decluttering in these areas of our lives:


1. Better focus – more mental clarity,


2. Reduces the feeling of being overwhelmed – a debilitating and self-sabotaging state,


3. Opens up space - in the physical as well as mental and spiritual areas of our lives – giving us a newfound freedom that we were being robbed of enjoying.

IDEA: Start where you are and pick one of these areas and do a ‘fast’ for a day – separate yourself from it as much as possible. Prove to yourself that you can control your thoughts and create a space by intentionally not allowing these thoughts to occur.


Cluttering may be one of the most obvious symptoms of childhood trauma, but it is one that we can all begin to cure by finding the inner strength, focus and intentionality to change. It begins with one thought – followed by one deliberate action!


We can all use a little help to jump start our decluttering efforts especially if you are thinking of moving. Check out our ‘Home Staging' page.





If you are thinking of, or in the middle of a divorce, we want you to know you're not alone and we’re here to help. If you would like to discuss how we can assist you with your future plans, please give me a call at 469-556-1185.   Geni Manning

If you are thinking of, or in the middle of a divorce, we want you to know you're not alone and we’re here to help. If you would like to discuss how we can assist you with your future plans, please give me a call at 469-556-1185.

Geni Manning


Disclaimer: The information provided in this website and our blogs is not intended for legal, financial or mental health advice but is for general informational purposes only. While we endeavor to provide the latest information on a particular subject, future changes to the source Information is beyond our control.

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